March 15, 2018

Batavia & Stonelick Twps declared free of Asian Longhorned Beetle in Clermont Co.

Posted in: ALB
March 2, 2018

Spring Litter Clean-Up Set For April 21

Leah Decatur’s Winning Design

Clermont SWCD and the Valley View Foundation are pleased to present this year’s winner of the 2018 Spring Litter Clean-Up T-shirt Design Contest, Leah Decatur, an 11th grader from CNE High School!  This year’s contest was sponsored by the Duke Energy Foundation, the Southern Ohio Association of Realtors, and the Clermont County Convention and Visitor’s Bureau.  Ms. Decatur will receive a $100 cash prize for her winning design and an additional $100 cash prize will be awarded to the CNE school art department. Leah will be presented her award at the March 21 county commissioner meeting.

The other grade-level winners and all the artwork submitted by local students can be viewed on the event website:  www.springlittercleanup.com.

This year’s event is scheduled for Saturday, April 21, 2018, from 9:00 a.m. – noon at various locations across Clermont County and the East Fork Little Miami River Watershed.

Volunteers are needed!  You can register individually, organize a school/scout group, or bring some neighborhood friends, to participate in this fun, worthwhile event!  Protective gloves and trash bags will be provided.  All volunteers will be given a picnic lunch and event t-shirt as a thank you for helping out.  Watch our website for locations and to register at: www.springlittercleanup.com, which will be available shortly.

We’d like to extend a big thank you to our event partners: Clermont Office of Environmental Quality, Clermont County Park District, Ohio Department of Natural Resources-State Parks, US Army Corp of Engineers, and Valley View Foundation.

March 2, 2018

Save the Date for our 75th Annual Meeting

This event will be held at the Historic Shaw Farms on the evening of September 13th. Plans are still being developed to make sure this is one that will not be soon forgotten. Check back as we get closer to learn more about our diamond anniversary celebration.

March 2, 2018

75 Years of Pond Construction and Management

As many of you know, ponds are not natural in Clermont County. All the ponds that you see have been constructed throughout the years for many different purposes. Today there are over 5,000 ponds that dot our landscape. Why are there so many and how has SWCD helped residents plan, install and maintain these features?

In 1943, when Clermont SWCD began helping landowners with soil problems, ponds were installed to remove livestock from creeks and provide a source of water during drought. Beginning in the 1940’s ponds were designed and constructed throughout the county by Soil Conservation Service (now NRCS) and SWCD for this purpose; 207 were installed by 1954. Hundreds were constructed throughout the 1950’s to 1980 with over 500 more constructed.

Cheaper means of getting livestock water, such as public waterlines that were crisscrossing the county caused a shift in funding away from ponds. The district now designs livestock watering facilities from some of these ponds, but most water comes from public water systems.

Fishing lakes also became popular during this time with 19 reported lakes in 1970 including the colorful named Bob and John’s Ding-a-ling Lake. Eventually larger lakes were installed in the county for flood control and other purposes including Stonelick Lake in 1950 and Harsha Lake (East Fork Lake) in 1978.

Many of these ponds are still on the landscape today, with many landowners still seeking assistance from SWCD for continuing maintenance. In 1958, SWCD began partnering with other organizations and professional pond care specialists to educate pond owners at pond management clinics. These clinics were held every two years or so into the 1980’s. In 1992 after a few years absence, SWCD began their annual pond clinic that is still popular today.

The purpose of a pond today has changed from when we started constructing them for drought purposes, but ponds are still desired for other reasons and each year more are constructed. Most ponds constructed today are for recreational or storm water control. If you own or maintain a pond built through the drought program, most likely it may not meet the needs of today. Most of these ponds have outlived their life expectancy and will need to be rehabbed as per the pond owner’s desires.

To find out more, join us at our next Pond Clinic on April 10th. Learn how to combat nature that is always affecting a pond and learn new techniques and stocking recommendations to maximize your pond potential.