June 4, 2018

Natural Resources Day at the Fair

Interactive stream table displayed by Clermont SWCD during last year’s event to demonstrate how streams function and the influence people have on them.

Join Clermont SWCD along with the Ohio Division of Wildlife, Ohio Division of Watercraft, Ohio Division of Parks, National Wild Turkey Federation, Clermont County parks, and others during the third Natural Resources Day which will be held at the Clermont County Fair at the Lykins Pavilion on Tuesday, June 24, 2018.

Archery, BB-guns, reptiles, and other hands on exhibits will be on display.  Meet with representatives from local conservation clubs, Ohio Trappers Association, local sportsmen clubs and SWCD.  Representatives will be available to discuss natural resource related issues and how you can improve wildlife habitat on your property.

 

 

 

December 6, 2017

Thanks to all our 2017 Cooperators!

Thanks to all our cooperators for all the conservation best management practices installed this year!

2600 The Farm                                  Fence, pipeline, HUA, watering facility

Doug Auxier                                       Cover crop

Roy Barger Jr.                                    Brush management (3)

Thomas Bellar                                   Conservation cover, herbaceous weed control

Bob Bolce                                           Brush management (3)

Tina Bosworth                                   Conservation Stewardship Program

Cincinnati Nature Center                 Conservation cover

Cornwell Family Partner                  Cover crop

Weiderhold Farms                            Nutrient management, Cover crop

Charles Ernstes                                Brush management(3)

Bob Fee                                              Cover crop

James Fulton                                    Cover crop

Carlos Hamilton                               Critical area planting, roof and cover (2)

Hal Herron                                         Cover crop

Ted Hollender                                   Nutrient management, Cover crop

Rob Hutchinson                                Cover crop

L & L Farm Holdings                        Forage planting (2)

James Liming                                    Cover crop

Mark Liming                                      Nutrient management, Cover crop

Michelle McClain                              Forage planting (2), pipeline, watering  facility, HUA, access road, underground outlet, brush management

Jim Metzger                                       Brush management (2)

Jeremy Myers                                   Cover crop

James Napier                                    Nutrient mgt. plan

Tony Panetta                                     Cover crop

Louis Rose                                         Cover crop

Tim Rose                                            Grassed waterway (2)

Verleigh Powers                               Fence

Don Smith                                         Brush management (2)

Charles Stahl                                    Cover crop

James Stahl                                      Cover crop

John Stahl                                         Cover crop

Robert Stahl                                      Cover crop

James Tolliver                                  Brush management (2)

Dave Uible                                         Conservation Stewardship Program

Varick Family Trust                         Brush management (3), forest stand improvement

Laura Weber                                      Brush management (5)

David Werring                                   Nutrient management

Tim Werring                                       Nutrient management, cover crop

Tony Werring                                     Nutrient management, cover crop

David Werring                                   Nutrient management, cover crop

August 3, 2017

Forestry Management Open House

Clermont SWCD, along with representatives from ODNR-Forestry, OSU Extension, and USDA are planning an open house to answer questions regarding private timber harvesting operations.

With the loss of ash trees across the region, many landowners are faced with difficult decisions on what to do with their properties. This opportunity will allow landowners to gain knowledge and meet forestry experts that can assess their situation and provide guidance on how to successfully manage their properties. There will also be opportunities to speak with an urban forester on those properties with just a few or no trees.

Please stop by our office on October 25th between the hours of 3-7 pm. Obtain maps, learn about funding for timber management and invasive control (sorry-still no ash tree removal funding), and threats and opportunities that could affect your forest.

Posted in: conservation, forestry
August 3, 2017

“Hall-of-Famer” to Lead Grazing School on October 18

Clermont SWCD, NRCS and OSU Extension are partnering with a conservationist hall-of-famer to host a pasture class on the evening of Wednesday, October 18th, from 6 to 9 pm at the Hatfield Farm, 1275 Caldwell Road in Bethel.
Bob Hendershot, retired NRCS Grazing Specialist and member of the Ohio State Conservationist Hall of Fame, will discuss growing and managing summer annuals and cover crops for forage, hay testing, new perennial forage varieties, interseeding forages for improved performance, and temporary fencing materials for rotational grazing efficiency. OSU Extension and NRCS personnel will review soil testing and funding programs available for improving pasture operations.
Food and drink will be provided by the Clermont County Farm Bureau.  There is no cost to attend, but registration is required. Please call our office at 513-732-7075 x2 to register.

A follow-up

event will be on Saturday November 4th at Greenacres Foundation in eastern Hamilton County. We’ll be looking at some exciting new research at Greenacres Foundation with effects of grassland management on meat quality, viewing Temple Grandin’s designed cattle handling facility, and multi-species grazing.  The information for this event is still being finalized.

June 5, 2017

Natural Resources Day at the Fair

Join Clermont SWCD along with the Ohio Division of Wildlife, Ohio Division of Watercraft, Ohio Division of Parks, National Wild Turkey Federation, Clermont County parks, and others during the third Natural Resources Day which will be held at the Clermont County Fair.  Archery, BB-guns, reptiles, and other hands on exhibits will be on display.  The event will be held at the Lykins Pavilion on Tuesday, July 25th, 2017.  Meet with representatives from local conservation clubs, Ohio Trappers Association and local sportsmen clubs.  Representatives will be available to discuss natural resource related issues and how you can improve wildlife habitat on your property.

 

Photo right: Interactive stream table displayed by Clermont SWCD during last year’s event to demonstrate how streams function and the influence people have on them.

Posted in: conservation
June 5, 2017

Erosion Concerns? Try a Riparian Buffer

Are you having problems with stream bank erosion? Planting a streamside, or riparian, buffer, may help solve this. Check this article for tips on planting.

If you own property that borders a stream and have concerns with the banks eroding and/or water quality, there are some relatively simple measures that you can take to alleviate the problems.  Sometimes the impact is too great, and steps are needed to provide armoring or protection, but if the erosion is not too severe, riparian buffers may be the answer to your worries.

Property owners that mow or weed right to the stream are setting themselves up for erosion problems.  Turf grass has very shallow roots which do a poor job of holding soil in place.  As a result, there is very little under the ground holding the soil in place, and it can be more easily washed away during high stream flows.  When natural vegetation is allowed to grow along a stream’s banks, the benefits are amazing.  When trees, shrubs and native grasses become established along a stream, it is referred to as a riparian buffer.  These plants have deep root systems which do a very good job of holding soil in place.

Buffers also provide many other benefits.  They shade and cool to the stream, which helps promote a healthy and diverse fish community.  Buffers are very effective at filtering pollutants such as lawn fertilizers, animal waste, and pesticides.  They also provide wildlife corridors and habitat.

Clermont SWCD suggests a buffer width of 25 feet for small streams, and increasing the width as the drainage area and stream gets bigger.  However, any buffer width is better than none at all.  The greater the width, the more positive impacts there will be for the stream.  Some plant species that will work well in a stream buffer zone include sycamore (Platanus occidentalis), willows (Salix sp.), red osier dogwood (Cornus sericea), spicebush (Lindera benzoin), and grasses such as meadow sage (Salvia pratensis) and different varieties of rushes (Juncus sp.)

If you have any questions or would like any guidance in establishing your own riparian buffer, contact us at 513-732-7075, or by email at jhahn@clermontcountyohio.gov.

April 21, 2017

Ohio Now Accepting Applications for Declining Pollinator Populations

COLUMBUS, OH, April 18, 2017 – The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) announced a new conservation effort for Ohio agriculture producers to help combat future declines of honey bees and Monarch butterflies by providing food and habitat sources. Through May 19, producers may apply for funding through the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) to plant cover crops, or plant milkweed, wildflowers, and native grasses in buffers and areas not in production.

More than 80 percent of the world’s plants need pollinators to survive, including many that provide the food we eat. But many pollinators like honey bees and Monarch butterflies are in trouble. That’s why NRCS works with private landowners to create food and habitat for pollinators on farms and in forests. In total, more than 3 dozen NRCS conservation practices provide benefits to pollinators.

For more information regarding the Honey Bee EQIP sign-up in Clermont or Brown County, contact Lori Lenhart, NRCS District Conservationist, at lori.lenhart@oh.usda.gov, or (513) 732-2181 ext. 3.

April 21, 2017

Ohio Now Accepting Applications for Declining Pollinator Populations

COLUMBUS, OH, April 18, 2017 – The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) announced a new conservation effort for Ohio agriculture producers to help combat future declines of honey bees and Monarch butterflies by providing food and habitat sources. Through May 19, producers may apply for funding through the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) to plant cover crops, or plant milkweed, wildflowers, and native grasses in buffers and areas not in production.

More than 80 percent of the world’s plants need pollinators to survive, including many that provide the food we eat. But many pollinators like honey bees and Monarch butterflies are in trouble. That’s why NRCS works with private landowners to create food and habitat for pollinators on farms and in forests. In total, more than 3 dozen NRCS conservation practices provide benefits to pollinators.

For more information regarding the Honey Bee EQIP sign-up in Clermont or Brown County, contact Lori Lenhart, NRCS District Conservationist, at lori.lenhart@oh.usda.gov, or (513) 732-2181 ext. 3.

March 6, 2017

US EPA Model Helps SWCD Focus Conservation Efforts

Predicted sediment loads for different areas in the Grassy Run watershed

Since 2008, Clermont SWCD and other members of the East Fork Watershed Cooperative have been working together to reduce nutrient and sediment levels in the East Fork Little Miami River and Harsha Lake. One Cooperative member – US EPA’s Office of Research and Development (ORD) – has developed a water quality model that is making it easier for SWCD to focus our conservation efforts.

Using data collected by various members of the Cooperative, US EPA-ORD has developed and calibrated a Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model for the East Fork watershed. The SWAT model has been effective in predicting sediment and nutrient loads from different land uses, and also in predicting the impact that various management scenarios might have on reducing pollutant loads. Already, this model has helped Clermont SWCD with several projects.

In 2011, Clermont SWCD received a Conservation Innovation Grant that provided funds for a concentrated planting of cover crops in the Grassy Run Watershed. US EPA-ORD applied the SWAT model to help identify areas within the watershed which are prone to high soil erosion, and therefore good candidates for winter cover crops. Once these locations were known, SWCD staff and the NRCS District Conservationist were able to work with producers to secure commitments to plant cover crops in these fields for a period of three years.

More recently, Clermont SWCD received a Resource Conservation Partnership Program grant for additional conservation practices in the Harsha Lake watershed. For each application received, US EPA-ORD uses the SWAT model to predict nutrient loadings from that field. The fields with the highest loadings receive additional points in the ranking process, and receive additional consideration for funding assistance. In this way, SWCD and NRCS are able to use limited grant funds in areas where they are most needed.

Through its partnership with US EPA-ORD, Clermont SWCD hopes to continue to use the SWAT model as part of future programs so that we may focus conservation efforts where they are most needed.

January 9, 2017

NRCS accepting CSP applications through February 3

The Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) is currently accepting applications for the Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP). CSP is the largest conservation program in the United States with 70 million acres of productive agricultural and forest land enrolled.

CSP helps agricultural and forestry producers build on existing conservation efforts while strengthening their operations. Most that are approved to participate in CSP have already been implementing conservation practices on their land. CSP offers more than 200 enhancements for those practices.

Once enrolled in CSP, the producer will have a one-on-one consultation with the NRCS conservation planner to evaluate the current operations and the natural resources on the property. Then the planner will determine if current activities meet stewardship eligibility, and will assist the producer in identifying additional enhancements to consider based on existing conservation practices, such as cover crops or precision agriculture. After the enhancements that best fit the operation are selected, CSP offers annual incentive payments for installing these activities on the land.

Applicants must have control of the land they want to enroll for a minimum of five years to be eligible. Producers interested in the program should contact the NRCS office prior to February 3, 2017. Additional information on the program is located at http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/csp. Producers in Clermont and Brown Counties should contact Lori Lenhart, NRCS District Conservationist, at (513) 732-2181 ext. 3, or by email at lori.lenhart@oh.usda.gov.