June 5, 2017

Call for SWCD Supervisor Candidates

Clermont SWCD is seeking candidates for its Board of Supervisors.  Two supervisors will be elected at the Annual Meeting which will be held on September 14.

Board Supervisors guide the district, its staff, and cooperating  agencies in efforts to implement conservation programs in the county that address management and conservation of soil, water and related resources. Board members should have a sincere interest in conservation and must have the enthusiasm, dedication and the time to serve as an elected official. This is a volunteer position, but supervisors can be reimbursed for mileage & expenses (registration, lodging, meals, etc.) related to events involving soil & water professionals.

What a potential supervisor needs to know:

* Candidate must be over 18 years old and a resident of Clermont County

* This is a volunteer position and runs in 3 year terms

* Board meetings are on the second Wednesday of the month at 8:00 AM and normally run 1 ½ to 2 hours.

* Attendance at occasional outside meetings, events or trainings is required

If you are interested in becoming a Board Supervisor for Clermont SWCD, please contact John McManus, District Administrator at jmcmanus@clermontcountyohio.gov or (513) 732-7075 Ext: 103.

June 5, 2017

Erosion Concerns? Try a Riparian Buffer

Are you having problems with stream bank erosion? Planting a streamside, or riparian, buffer, may help solve this. Check this article for tips on planting.

If you own property that borders a stream and have concerns with the banks eroding and/or water quality, there are some relatively simple measures that you can take to alleviate the problems.  Sometimes the impact is too great, and steps are needed to provide armoring or protection, but if the erosion is not too severe, riparian buffers may be the answer to your worries.

Property owners that mow or weed right to the stream are setting themselves up for erosion problems.  Turf grass has very shallow roots which do a poor job of holding soil in place.  As a result, there is very little under the ground holding the soil in place, and it can be more easily washed away during high stream flows.  When natural vegetation is allowed to grow along a stream’s banks, the benefits are amazing.  When trees, shrubs and native grasses become established along a stream, it is referred to as a riparian buffer.  These plants have deep root systems which do a very good job of holding soil in place.

Buffers also provide many other benefits.  They shade and cool to the stream, which helps promote a healthy and diverse fish community.  Buffers are very effective at filtering pollutants such as lawn fertilizers, animal waste, and pesticides.  They also provide wildlife corridors and habitat.

Clermont SWCD suggests a buffer width of 25 feet for small streams, and increasing the width as the drainage area and stream gets bigger.  However, any buffer width is better than none at all.  The greater the width, the more positive impacts there will be for the stream.  Some plant species that will work well in a stream buffer zone include sycamore (Platanus occidentalis), willows (Salix sp.), red osier dogwood (Cornus sericea), spicebush (Lindera benzoin), and grasses such as meadow sage (Salvia pratensis) and different varieties of rushes (Juncus sp.)

If you have any questions or would like any guidance in establishing your own riparian buffer, contact us at 513-732-7075, or by email at jhahn@clermontcountyohio.gov.