June 4, 2018

Natural Resources Day at the Fair

Interactive stream table displayed by Clermont SWCD during last year’s event to demonstrate how streams function and the influence people have on them.

Join Clermont SWCD along with the Ohio Division of Wildlife, Ohio Division of Watercraft, Ohio Division of Parks, National Wild Turkey Federation, Clermont County parks, and others during the third Natural Resources Day which will be held at the Clermont County Fair at the Lykins Pavilion on Tuesday, June 24, 2018.

Archery, BB-guns, reptiles, and other hands on exhibits will be on display.  Meet with representatives from local conservation clubs, Ohio Trappers Association, local sportsmen clubs and SWCD.  Representatives will be available to discuss natural resource related issues and how you can improve wildlife habitat on your property.

 

 

 

December 6, 2017

Thanks to all our 2017 Cooperators!

Thanks to all our cooperators for all the conservation best management practices installed this year!

2600 The Farm                                  Fence, pipeline, HUA, watering facility

Doug Auxier                                       Cover crop

Roy Barger Jr.                                    Brush management (3)

Thomas Bellar                                   Conservation cover, herbaceous weed control

Bob Bolce                                           Brush management (3)

Tina Bosworth                                   Conservation Stewardship Program

Cincinnati Nature Center                 Conservation cover

Cornwell Family Partner                  Cover crop

Weiderhold Farms                            Nutrient management, Cover crop

Charles Ernstes                                Brush management(3)

Bob Fee                                              Cover crop

James Fulton                                    Cover crop

Carlos Hamilton                               Critical area planting, roof and cover (2)

Hal Herron                                         Cover crop

Ted Hollender                                   Nutrient management, Cover crop

Rob Hutchinson                                Cover crop

L & L Farm Holdings                        Forage planting (2)

James Liming                                    Cover crop

Mark Liming                                      Nutrient management, Cover crop

Michelle McClain                              Forage planting (2), pipeline, watering  facility, HUA, access road, underground outlet, brush management

Jim Metzger                                       Brush management (2)

Jeremy Myers                                   Cover crop

James Napier                                    Nutrient mgt. plan

Tony Panetta                                     Cover crop

Louis Rose                                         Cover crop

Tim Rose                                            Grassed waterway (2)

Verleigh Powers                               Fence

Don Smith                                         Brush management (2)

Charles Stahl                                    Cover crop

James Stahl                                      Cover crop

John Stahl                                         Cover crop

Robert Stahl                                      Cover crop

James Tolliver                                  Brush management (2)

Dave Uible                                         Conservation Stewardship Program

Varick Family Trust                         Brush management (3), forest stand improvement

Laura Weber                                      Brush management (5)

David Werring                                   Nutrient management

Tim Werring                                       Nutrient management, cover crop

Tony Werring                                     Nutrient management, cover crop

David Werring                                   Nutrient management, cover crop

August 3, 2017

Forestry Management Open House

Clermont SWCD, along with representatives from ODNR-Forestry, OSU Extension, and USDA are planning an open house to answer questions regarding private timber harvesting operations.

With the loss of ash trees across the region, many landowners are faced with difficult decisions on what to do with their properties. This opportunity will allow landowners to gain knowledge and meet forestry experts that can assess their situation and provide guidance on how to successfully manage their properties. There will also be opportunities to speak with an urban forester on those properties with just a few or no trees.

Please stop by our office on October 25th between the hours of 3-7 pm. Obtain maps, learn about funding for timber management and invasive control (sorry-still no ash tree removal funding), and threats and opportunities that could affect your forest.

Posted in: conservation, forestry
June 5, 2017

Erosion Concerns? Try a Riparian Buffer

Are you having problems with stream bank erosion? Planting a streamside, or riparian, buffer, may help solve this. Check this article for tips on planting.

If you own property that borders a stream and have concerns with the banks eroding and/or water quality, there are some relatively simple measures that you can take to alleviate the problems.  Sometimes the impact is too great, and steps are needed to provide armoring or protection, but if the erosion is not too severe, riparian buffers may be the answer to your worries.

Property owners that mow or weed right to the stream are setting themselves up for erosion problems.  Turf grass has very shallow roots which do a poor job of holding soil in place.  As a result, there is very little under the ground holding the soil in place, and it can be more easily washed away during high stream flows.  When natural vegetation is allowed to grow along a stream’s banks, the benefits are amazing.  When trees, shrubs and native grasses become established along a stream, it is referred to as a riparian buffer.  These plants have deep root systems which do a very good job of holding soil in place.

Buffers also provide many other benefits.  They shade and cool to the stream, which helps promote a healthy and diverse fish community.  Buffers are very effective at filtering pollutants such as lawn fertilizers, animal waste, and pesticides.  They also provide wildlife corridors and habitat.

Clermont SWCD suggests a buffer width of 25 feet for small streams, and increasing the width as the drainage area and stream gets bigger.  However, any buffer width is better than none at all.  The greater the width, the more positive impacts there will be for the stream.  Some plant species that will work well in a stream buffer zone include sycamore (Platanus occidentalis), willows (Salix sp.), red osier dogwood (Cornus sericea), spicebush (Lindera benzoin), and grasses such as meadow sage (Salvia pratensis) and different varieties of rushes (Juncus sp.)

If you have any questions or would like any guidance in establishing your own riparian buffer, contact us at 513-732-7075, or by email at jhahn@clermontcountyohio.gov.

March 6, 2017

US EPA Model Helps SWCD Focus Conservation Efforts

Predicted sediment loads for different areas in the Grassy Run watershed

Since 2008, Clermont SWCD and other members of the East Fork Watershed Cooperative have been working together to reduce nutrient and sediment levels in the East Fork Little Miami River and Harsha Lake. One Cooperative member – US EPA’s Office of Research and Development (ORD) – has developed a water quality model that is making it easier for SWCD to focus our conservation efforts.

Using data collected by various members of the Cooperative, US EPA-ORD has developed and calibrated a Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model for the East Fork watershed. The SWAT model has been effective in predicting sediment and nutrient loads from different land uses, and also in predicting the impact that various management scenarios might have on reducing pollutant loads. Already, this model has helped Clermont SWCD with several projects.

In 2011, Clermont SWCD received a Conservation Innovation Grant that provided funds for a concentrated planting of cover crops in the Grassy Run Watershed. US EPA-ORD applied the SWAT model to help identify areas within the watershed which are prone to high soil erosion, and therefore good candidates for winter cover crops. Once these locations were known, SWCD staff and the NRCS District Conservationist were able to work with producers to secure commitments to plant cover crops in these fields for a period of three years.

More recently, Clermont SWCD received a Resource Conservation Partnership Program grant for additional conservation practices in the Harsha Lake watershed. For each application received, US EPA-ORD uses the SWAT model to predict nutrient loadings from that field. The fields with the highest loadings receive additional points in the ranking process, and receive additional consideration for funding assistance. In this way, SWCD and NRCS are able to use limited grant funds in areas where they are most needed.

Through its partnership with US EPA-ORD, Clermont SWCD hopes to continue to use the SWAT model as part of future programs so that we may focus conservation efforts where they are most needed.

November 23, 2016

International Delegation Visits Clermont SWCD

In October, a delegation with the China Ministry of Agriculture visited the Clermont SWCD office on their tour of American agriculture. The delegation was deeply interested in programs that are available to farmers and mapping soils, including soil health.  The delegation visited with staff from our office and Lori Lenhart with the Natural Resources Conservation Service.

November 23, 2016

Clermont County to Host New and Small Farm College

Are you interested in learning how to make the most of a few acres? If so, the OSU Extension Clermont office is hosting an eight week course just for you. Topics include: Getting Started, Sources of Information, Legal/Insurance, Financial/records, Marketing and more.

Weekly classes will be held on Thursday evenings in the 4-H Hall on the Clermont County Fairgrounds between January 12 and March 2. The cost to register is $150 for the first person from a farm and $100 for each additional person. This includes dinner, drinks and dessert each night, along with a materials binder and one soil sample evaluation.

To register or for more information, contact Gigi Neal at neal.331@osu.edu or 513-732-7070.

November 23, 2016

Duke Energy, Clermont SWCD Partner on a Beautiful Solution to Storm Water Pollution

Recently, Duke Energy and the Clermont Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD) partnered with a homeowners’ association in a Union Township subdivision to combat runoff problems and beautify the neighborhood at the same time.

Under a $25,000 grant from the Duke Energy Foundation, Clermont SWCD worked with the Shayler Woods Homeowners Association (HOA) to install a 1000 square foot rain garden in a section of the subdivision where storm water did not receive any treatment before it reached a small creek. The garden will catch storm flows from two small drainage areas and allow it to soak into the ground over a day or two rather than running off into the creek. Along with reducing flow, the garden will help filter pollutants, including nutrients found in lawn fertilizers what can contribute to algae blooms.

Gene Benninger, the president of the Shayler Woods HOA, said “We are pleased that our community was chosen for this project. It has greatly enhanced the appearance of the landscape, and we look forward to Spring when everything will be blooming.”

Clermont SWCD offers guidance to any landowner in Clermont County, including homeowners associations, interested in creating their own rain garden.  Requests for assistance can be made by calling (513) 732-7075. or sending an email to ssteffensen@clermontcountyohio.gov.

November 23, 2016

Clermont SWCD Thanks Its 2016 Cooperators

Thanks to all our Cooperators for all the Conservation Best Management Practices installed this Year!

Agri-chemical Handling Facility

Wolfer Farms

Brush Management

Bob Bolce

Charles Ernstes (4)

Jim Metzger

Jeremy Mount (2)

Don Smith (2)

Laura Weber (3)

Dan Welz

Arthur Williams (2)

Conservation Crop Rotation

Tony Panetta

Robert Stahl

Conservation Stewardship Program

Tina Bosworth

Dave Uible

Cover Crop Plantings:

Doug Auxier  (2)

Troy Baker

Robert Fee

Jason Grant

John Gray

Jeff Gunter

L & L Farm Holdings

Ted Hollender

Rob Hutchison

Tim Jarman

James Liming

Mark Liming

Brian Lung

Tony Panetta

Louie Rose

Richard Rosselot

Robert Stahl

Dan Tarvin

David Werring

Tim Werring

Tony Werring

Eugene Wiederhold

Wolfer Farms (2)

Critical Area Planting

David Morgan

Waltz Enterprises

Forest Stand Improvement

Jeremy Mount

Varick Trust (2)

Heavy Use Area Protection

Wolfer Farms

Herbaceous Weed Control

Joel Monteith (2)

Laura Weber

High Tunnel

Louise Gartner

Adam Mancino

Prescribed Grazing

Victor Riley

Dan Weber (2)

Tree/Shrub Establishment

Joel Monteith (2)

Jeremy Mount

Laura Weber

Arthur Williams

Upland Wildlife Habitat Management

Cincinnati Nature Center

August 9, 2016

Found: Williamsburg High School Bell

BurgBell_16SLCWe’ve found some interesting stuff over the years of the Spring Litter Cleanup, but this year’s find may be the best. Two Western Brown students found the bell used by Williamsburg High School during football games when the Wildcats score a touchdown. The school was very happy to have the bell returned. So if you’re missing something, you may want to join us for the 2017 Spring Litter Cleanup!