What Exactly is Nutrient Management?

Nutrient management is not always a conservation practice that one can visually see in the field, but more of a management change. The goal of this practice is to reduce the amount of nutrient loss into our waterways with science based fertilizer/manure application rates based on crop needs and soils. This practice follows the 4-R’s of nutrient management; the right source, right rate, right time, and right place.

Producers follow guidelines to safely apply their nutrients in a sustainable manner. This may include updated soil testing, variable rate applications, no surface applications on frozen or snow covered grounds, limited fall nitrogen applications and nutrient applications that follow the Tri-State Fertility Guide recommendations to name a few.

The end results is economical crop yields, decreased amount of nutrient loss, and enhanced water quality. This practice provides a written plan for producers to follow for their farms’ specific needs. The end result is greening up our fields and not our lakes and rivers.

Rain Barrels – Collecting Water for Your Outdoor Needs

The use of rain barrels lowers municipal water demands and  decreases storm water runoff. It’s a great way to conserve water and it’s free water for use in your landscape!

FEATURES

  • 50 gallon capacity
  • Large opening lid with  locking feature
  • Lid can be reversed to act as a planter
  • FlexiFit™ diverter and all parts included for installation. FlexiFit™ diverter returns rainwater to downspout when barrel is full – no spillover
  • 10 Year UV Resistance
  • AVAILABLE IN GRANITE (Shown)

The cost to purchase a rain barrel is $85.00 each. Limited quantities are available, so please email or call our office at (513) 732-7075 ext. 2.

Don’t Dump! What to Do With Household Hazardous Waste

With spring cleaning just around the corner, many residents will encounter leftover paint, chemicals, solvents, and automotive fluids that they may not know how to dispose of. These items should never be dumped down the storm drain or in the street because they go directly to our streams, rivers, lakes, and water supplies. There are safer ways to dispose of hazardous household chemicals and automotive fluids that do not threaten our water quality or public health.

In an effort to prevent household hazardous waste contamination, Clermont County and the Adams-Clermont Solid Waste District have worked hard to make the disposal of household hazardous waste more convenient for county residents. Disposing of old motor oil, brake or transmission fluid, and antifreeze can be tough. The good news is that residents can bring these used fluids, at no cost, to the Fleet Management garage, located on Filager Road just off SR 222 north of Batavia. These items are accepted Monday through Friday, from 8:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Other hazardous household chemicals such as paints, thinners, and solvents can also be disposed of properly. Unused latex paint can be left open in the container until dry, then disposed of in general waste. There are also local outlets for other materials, such as tires, car batteries, nickel-cadmium batteries, propane tanks and more. You can search for disposal or recycling locations at http://oeq.net/recycling/.

If no local outlets are available, the Solid Waste District will issue Clermont residents a voucher, which allows them to take the material to Environmental Enterprises on Spring Grove Avenue in Cincinnati and the District will pay the disposal fee. To obtain a voucher, or for more information on Solid Waste District programs, call (513) 732-7894 x3.

Want to Get Serious About Single Use Plastic Waste?

Single-use plastics, or disposable plastics, are used only once before they are thrown away or recycled. These items are things like plastic bags, straws, coffee stirrers, soda and water bottles and most food packaging. Single-use plastic is almost entirely about convenience.  Thankfully, there are industries making great strides to reduce their plastic waste. Many airlines have begun recycling plastic cups and straws, and companies such as Nestle and Unilever pledge to make all plastic packaging either 100% recyclable or reusable by 2025. Kroger will be eliminating single use grocery bags as of 2025. Nevertheless, significant progress is yet to be made and much of the effort comes down to us changing our behavior as consumers.

Here’s what YOU can do:

  1. Stop buying water in single-use plastic bottles. Get a sink or jug-mounted filter at home. Buy a bottle that you can leave in your car. Or even buy a separate one for your car, purse, office and home.
  2. Use cloth or recyclable bags for your groceries. You can find these bags for sale at most retailers, or alot of organizations give them away as free promotional items.
  3. Don’t use plastic bags for vegetables you’re going to wash anyway. Earthwise & Purifyou have mesh produce bags available, or skip bagging all together.
  4. Bring your own coffee mug to your favorite coffee vendor.
  5. Own your own straw, or stop using one. Paper, metal, and glass alternatives exist.
  6. Stop using ziplock bags and use glass or Tupperware instead. Even plastic Tupperware is made of recyclable (and even recycled) material!
  7. Rinse out and recycle your plastic bottles. These can be recycled many times when properly disposed.
  8. Participate in litter / river cleanups…. Clermont County has a Spring Litter Cleanup in April every year. See our website for updates: https://www.clermontswcd.org/.
  9. Lobby your local and state government to make recycling a priority. You can go to https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legislators/district-maps to find out who your state representatives are and how to contact them.

In total, more than 60 countries have enacted plastic bans and/or fees in order to cut down on plastic waste, and many more are likely to follow soon. Let each of us do our part to cut down on plastic waste.

 

Ohio Pond Management Handbook

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources-Division of Wildlife has an excellent Pond Management Handbook available online for those that own ponds. This free downloadable resource is a must have for pond owners. Inside you will find information regarding fish stocking, fish management, managing aquatic vegetation and other problems and solutions regarding pond health and management.

This handbook was made for the typical pond owner, easy to read, many pictures, and geared to issues found here in Ohio. This publication was updated in 2015.