June 28, 2019

NRCS Announces Disaster Recovery Relief for Ohio Farmers

NRCS will invest $4 million to help Ohio farmers who were unable to plant crops, or experienced crop loss due to flooded or wet fields. This sign-up is an opportunity for farmers to plant a cover crop.

COLUMBUS, June 28, 2019 – Extreme weather conditions like the recent excessive rains and tornadoes have negatively impacted Ohio farmers. The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service will invest $4 million to help Ohio agricultural producers recover. Technical and financial assistance is now available to producers who were unable to plant their crops, or who have experienced crop loss due to flooded or wet fields. This sign-up is an opportunity for farmers to plant a cover crop.

“NRCS can be a valuable partner to help Ohio landowners with their agricultural recovery effort,” said State Conservationist Terry Cosby for NRCS in Ohio. “This special sign-up encourages farmers to plant cover crops to improve water quality and soil health, prevent soil erosion, and suppress weeds on areas not planted to crops.”

NRCS will utilize the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) for this special disaster recovery sign-up. EQIP is a voluntary conservation program that helps agricultural producers protect the environment while promoting agricultural production.

Cover crops provide an alternative to fields going fallow and remaining uncovered. Cover crops also improve soil vitality by adding nutrients and organic matter. Many fields that are saturated for a long period of time face a loss of soil organisms. Cover crop roots reestablish soil health and create pathways for air and water to move through the soil, which is key to restoring it.
There are significant changes with cover crops and we want producers to be successful in their 2020 planting year. Educational cover crop workshops and field days are readily available throughout Ohio to learn more. Additional information is also available on the NRCS website and farmers.gov/prevented-planting.

Landowners should coordinate with other USDA farm agencies when participating in related programs. It is a producer’s responsibility to work directly with their insurance agent and RMA to ensure they understand their policy.

To apply for this special EQIP opportunity, farmers in Clermont County should contact either Lori Lenhart, NRCS District Conservationist, or Jenna Swanson, NRCS Soil Scientist at (513) 732-2181 ext. 3. Applications will be accepted beginning July 1, 2019 until funding is exhausted.

June 5, 2019

It’s Not Too Late to Purchase a Rain Barrel

The use of rain barrels lowers municipal water demands and saves energy at water treatment facilities by reducing water pollution and storm water runoff.

FEATURES

  • 50 gallon capacity
  • Large opening lid with  locking feature
  • Lid can be reversed to act as a planter
  • FlexiFit™ diverter and all parts included for installation. FlexiFit™ diverter returns rainwater to downspout when barrel is full – no spillover
  • 10 Year UV Resistance
  • AVAILABLE IN TERRA COTTA OR GRANITE – PLEASE SPECIFY

The cost to purchase a rain barrel is $80.00 each. Limited quantities are availavle, so please email or call our office at (513) 732-7075 ext. 2.

Posted in: Uncategorized
June 5, 2019

Another Successful Clermont County Cleanup

The Clermont Soil & Water Conservation District and Valley View Foundation are pleased to report that the 2019 Spring Litter Clean-Up was another great success! The event took place on Saturday, April 13, 2019, at sites across Clermont County and the East Fork Little Miami River Watershed. The event drew 450 volunteers to clean up 11 sites, including 10 miles of riverbank and lake shoreline! Volunteers collectively cleared approximately 3.2 tons of trash and contributed over 1,133 hours of community service.

We truly appreciate the support from our event sponsors: the Clermont County Convention and Visitor’s Bureau, the Southern Ohio Association of Realtors, the Duke Energy Foundation and the Buckeye United Fly Fishers!

Thank you also to our partnering agencies and organizations, including the Clermont Office of Environmental Quality, Clermont County Park District, Clermont Office of Public Information, Ohio State University Extension, Ohio Department of Natural Resources—Divisions of Parks and Watercraft, Highland SWCD, U.S. Army Corp of Engineers and the Friends of Stonelick State Park.

Total Quality Logistics cleanup crew

June 5, 2019

Save the Date – 76th Annual Meeting is Sept. 12

Celebrate with us at the Multi Purpose Building on the Clermont County Fairgrounds in Owensville on Thursday, Sept. 12th from 5:00 to 8:00 PM. Watch www.clermontswcd.org for more information, or follow us on Facebook.

June 5, 2019

Call for SWCD Supervisor Candidates

Clermont SWCD is seeking candidates for its Board of Supervisors.  Two supervisors will be elected at the 2019 Annual Meeting which will be held on September 12.

Board Supervisors guide the district, its staff, and cooperating  agencies in efforts to implement conservation programs in the county that address management and conservation of soil, water and related resources. Board members should have a sincere interest in conservation and must have the enthusiasm, dedication and the time to serve as an elected official. This is a volunteer position, but supervisors can be reimbursed for mileage & expenses (registration, lodging, meals, etc.) related to events involving soil & water professionals.

What a potential supervisor needs to know:

* Candidate must be over 18 years old and a resident of Clermont County.

* This is a volunteer position and runs in 3 year terms.

* Board meetings are on the second Wednesday of the month at 8:00 AM and normally run 1 ½ to 2 hours.

* Attendance at occasional outside meetings, events or training is required.

If you are interested in becoming a Board Supervisor for Clermont SWCD, please contact John McManus, District Administrator by email or at (513) 732-7075 Ext: 103.

June 5, 2019

SWCD Water Quality Efforts Recognized

Full detention structure in field waterway

Clermont SWCD, along with the Clermont Office of Environmental Quality and the US EPA Office of Research and Development were awarded the top government storm water project of the year at the 2019 Ohio Storm Water Conference in Sharonville, OH. Our project was funded by a USDA Conservation Innovation Grant and was installed in 2015. This project was funded to research innovative solutions by developing new strategies to support conservation efforts. The project involved the installation of an urban storm water detention basin into an agricultural setting. This project is currently being researched to determine effectiveness of agricultural nutrient removal.

Submerged treatment bed for nutrient removal

The need to address agricultural runoff is important because of the water quality degradation and algal blooms that are occurring around the world. Nutrients leaving agricultural fields are a contributing factor to water quality problems. The soils that we have in our county are very unique to Ohio and an “outside the box” approach was needed because current management practices do not always apply in our area.

The partnership to make this project successful includes many county, state and federal agencies, landowners, and the private industry. This project speaks to the great success of everyone working together for a viable solution.

February 28, 2019

Don’t Dump! What to Do With Household Hazardous Waste

With spring cleaning just around the corner, many residents will encounter leftover paint, chemicals, solvents, and automotive fluids that they may not know how to dispose of. These items should never be dumped down the storm drain or in the street because they go directly to our streams, rivers, lakes, and water supplies. There are safer ways to dispose of hazardous household chemicals and automotive fluids that do not threaten our water quality or public health.

In an effort to prevent household hazardous waste contamination, Clermont County and the Adams-Clermont Solid Waste District have worked hard to make the disposal of household hazardous waste more convenient for county residents. Disposing of old motor oil, brake or transmission fluid, and antifreeze can be tough. The good news is that residents can bring these used fluids, at no cost, to the Fleet Management garage, located on Filager Road just off SR 222 north of Batavia. These items are accepted Monday through Friday, from 8:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Other hazardous household chemicals such as paints, thinners, and solvents can also be disposed of properly. Unused latex paint can be left open in the container until dry, then disposed of in general waste. There are also local outlets for other materials, such as tires, car batteries, nickel-cadmium batteries, propane tanks and more. You can search for disposal or recycling locations at http://oeq.net/recycling/.

If no local outlets are available, the Solid Waste District will issue Clermont residents a voucher, which allows them to take the material to Environmental Enterprises on Spring Grove Avenue in Cincinnati and the District will pay the disposal fee. To obtain a voucher, or for more information on Solid Waste District programs, call (513) 732-7894 x3.

Posted in: Uncategorized
February 28, 2019

Want to Get Serious About Single Use Plastic Waste?

Single-use plastics, or disposable plastics, are used only once before they are thrown away or recycled. These items are things like plastic bags, straws, coffee stirrers, soda and water bottles and most food packaging. Single-use plastic is almost entirely about convenience.  Thankfully, there are industries making great strides to reduce their plastic waste. Many airlines have begun recycling plastic cups and straws, and companies such as Nestle and Unilever pledge to make all plastic packaging either 100% recyclable or reusable by 2025. Kroger will be eliminating single use grocery bags as of 2025. Nevertheless, significant progress is yet to be made and much of the effort comes down to us changing our behavior as consumers.

Here’s what YOU can do:

  1. Stop buying water in single-use plastic bottles. Get a sink or jug-mounted filter at home. Buy a bottle that you can leave in your car. Or even buy a separate one for your car, purse, office and home.
  2. Use cloth or recyclable bags for your groceries. You can find these bags for sale at most retailers, or alot of organizations give them away as free promotional items.
  3. Don’t use plastic bags for vegetables you’re going to wash anyway. Earthwise & Purifyou have mesh produce bags available, or skip bagging all together.
  4. Bring your own coffee mug to your favorite coffee vendor.
  5. Own your own straw, or stop using one. Paper, metal, and glass alternatives exist.
  6. Stop using ziplock bags and use glass or Tupperware instead. Even plastic Tupperware is made of recyclable (and even recycled) material!
  7. Rinse out and recycle your plastic bottles. These can be recycled many times when properly disposed.
  8. Participate in litter / river cleanups…. Clermont County has a Spring Litter Cleanup in April every year. See our website for updates: https://www.clermontswcd.org/.
  9. Lobby your local and state government to make recycling a priority. You can go to https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legislators/district-maps to find out who your state representatives are and how to contact them.

In total, more than 60 countries have enacted plastic bans and/or fees in order to cut down on plastic waste, and many more are likely to follow soon. Let each of us do our part to cut down on plastic waste.

 

Posted in: Uncategorized
January 7, 2019

Local Farmers Invited to Upcoming Workshop

Pictured: Greg Nause hosting a cover crop field day.

Southwest Ohio Agricultural Conservation Menu

The Soil and Water Conservation Districts in Brown, Clermont, Clinton and Highland counties are working together and looking for farmer input to develop a new website, the Southwest Ohio Agricultural Conservation Menu (SOACM), to share information on conservation programs and technical services that are available locally to advance farming practices.  The SOACM website will be a one-stop clearinghouse for all conservation programs.  The site will also include information and regular updates on watershed health and local water quality monitoring efforts.  The intent of the SOACM website is to provide local farmers with the services and information they need to choose the right agricultural Best Management Practices (BMPs) that can advance their farming operations and provide protection for local rivers and lakes.  If you’re interested in participating in this project, please register here or call the Clermont SWCD: (513) 732-7075.

Register below to participate in 2019 Focus Group Meetings!

Posted in: Uncategorized
December 6, 2018

Hollaender Honored as SWCD Cooperator of the Year

Ted Hollaender (left) receiving recognition from Clermont County Commissioner David Painter

Ted Hollaender was honored as Clermont SWCD’s Cooperator of the Year at its 75th anniversary annual meeting on September 13. Ted farms about 700 acres of corn and soybeans in northern Clermont County, and is constantly exploring different ways to improve his operations, especially for conservation. He has participated in the USDA Environmental Quality Incentives Program to make improvements on his land using management practices such as no till, nutrient management, conservation crop rotation, cover crops, and he has plans for pollinator plantings. Ted is also enrolled in the Conservation Stewardship Program, which serves to reward producers for being good stewards of the land, while making further improvements.

When applying fertilizer, he follows the 4-R strategy (Right source, Right rate, Right time, and Right place) of nutrient management, and includes the use of variable rate applications recommended in the Tri-State Fertility Guide.

Ted has also been willing to help the District with different projects, including researching the benefits of using the Haney soil test, and allowing us to collect soil samples to help better calibrate the East Fork Soil and Water Assessment Tool model.

Ted plants about 450 acres of cover crops each year – about 2/3 of his fields. He has experimented with several different types of cover crop mixes to build soil health and increase infiltration at a faster pace than would occur with a single species.