June 4, 2018

Call for SWCD Supervisor Candidates

Clermont SWCD is seeking candidates for its Board of Supervisors.  Two supervisors will be elected at the Annual Meeting which will be held on September 13.

Board Supervisors guide the district, its staff, and cooperating  agencies in efforts to implement conservation programs in the county that address management and conservation of soil, water and related resources. Board members should have a sincere interest in conservation and must have the enthusiasm, dedication and the time to serve as an elected official. This is a volunteer position, but supervisors can be reimbursed for mileage & expenses (registration, lodging, meals, etc.) related to events involving soil & water professionals.

What a potential supervisor needs to know:

* Candidate must be over 18 years old and a resident of Clermont County

* This is a volunteer position and runs in 3 year terms

* Board meetings are on the second Wednesday of the month at 8:00 AM and normally run 1 ½ to 2 hours.

* Attendance at occasional outside meetings, events or trainings is required

If you are interested in becoming a Board Supervisor for Clermont SWCD, please email or call John McManus, District Administrator at (513) 732-7075 Ext: 103.

March 15, 2018

Batavia & Stonelick Twps declared free of Asian Longhorned Beetle in Clermont Co.

Posted in: ALB
March 2, 2018

75 Years of Pond Construction and Management

As many of you know, ponds are not natural in Clermont County. All the ponds that you see have been constructed throughout the years for many different purposes. Today there are over 5,000 ponds that dot our landscape. Why are there so many and how has SWCD helped residents plan, install and maintain these features?

In 1943, when Clermont SWCD began helping landowners with soil problems, ponds were installed to remove livestock from creeks and provide a source of water during drought. Beginning in the 1940’s ponds were designed and constructed throughout the county by Soil Conservation Service (now NRCS) and SWCD for this purpose; 207 were installed by 1954. Hundreds were constructed throughout the 1950’s to 1980 with over 500 more constructed.

Cheaper means of getting livestock water, such as public waterlines that were crisscrossing the county caused a shift in funding away from ponds. The district now designs livestock watering facilities from some of these ponds, but most water comes from public water systems.

Fishing lakes also became popular during this time with 19 reported lakes in 1970 including the colorful named Bob and John’s Ding-a-ling Lake. Eventually larger lakes were installed in the county for flood control and other purposes including Stonelick Lake in 1950 and Harsha Lake (East Fork Lake) in 1978.

Many of these ponds are still on the landscape today, with many landowners still seeking assistance from SWCD for continuing maintenance. In 1958, SWCD began partnering with other organizations and professional pond care specialists to educate pond owners at pond management clinics. These clinics were held every two years or so into the 1980’s. In 1992 after a few years absence, SWCD began their annual pond clinic that is still popular today.

The purpose of a pond today has changed from when we started constructing them for drought purposes, but ponds are still desired for other reasons and each year more are constructed. Most ponds constructed today are for recreational or storm water control. If you own or maintain a pond built through the drought program, most likely it may not meet the needs of today. Most of these ponds have outlived their life expectancy and will need to be rehabbed as per the pond owner’s desires.

To find out more, join us at our next Pond Clinic on April 10th. Learn how to combat nature that is always affecting a pond and learn new techniques and stocking recommendations to maximize your pond potential.

December 6, 2017

Hatfield Brothers Are Honored as District Cooperators of the Year

From left – Mark Hatfield, Ernie Hatfield, Lowell Hatfield, John McManus, Administrator, Todd Winemiller, Board Member

The Hatfield Brothers including Mark, Lowell, and Ernie are located in Franklin Township. They have been farming in the Felicity area since the mid 1970s. From the beginning, they have been exploring different ways to improve their farming operations, especially from the conservation side of things.  Currently, the Hatfields farm around 1000 acres, all of it no-till, and practice conservation crop rotation, but they have placed a special focus on cover crops.

Showing their imaginative and innovative side, they have modified their combine by adding seeder boxes and seed tubes, so that during harvest, the cover crop seeds are planted in between the crop rows. For the past two years, they have successfully planted cover crops on every field they farm.

They have always been willing to share information on their unique planting method at field days hosted by Soil and Water, and Ernie Hatfield was one of five farmers highlighted in our Cover Crop Farmers of Southwest Ohio booklet.

The Clermont Soil and Water Conservation District commends the Hatfield Brothers for their stewardship efforts, and for being active partners in helping to protect the land and valuable natural resources of the county.

Posted in: Uncategorized
December 6, 2017

Thanks to all our 2017 Cooperators!

Thanks to all our cooperators for all the conservation best management practices installed this year!

2600 The Farm                                  Fence, pipeline, HUA, watering facility

Doug Auxier                                       Cover crop

Roy Barger Jr.                                    Brush management (3)

Thomas Bellar                                   Conservation cover, herbaceous weed control

Bob Bolce                                           Brush management (3)

Tina Bosworth                                   Conservation Stewardship Program

Cincinnati Nature Center                 Conservation cover

Cornwell Family Partner                  Cover crop

Weiderhold Farms                            Nutrient management, Cover crop

Charles Ernstes                                Brush management(3)

Bob Fee                                              Cover crop

James Fulton                                    Cover crop

Carlos Hamilton                               Critical area planting, roof and cover (2)

Hal Herron                                         Cover crop

Ted Hollender                                   Nutrient management, Cover crop

Rob Hutchinson                                Cover crop

L & L Farm Holdings                        Forage planting (2)

James Liming                                    Cover crop

Mark Liming                                      Nutrient management, Cover crop

Michelle McClain                              Forage planting (2), pipeline, watering  facility, HUA, access road, underground outlet, brush management

Jim Metzger                                       Brush management (2)

Jeremy Myers                                   Cover crop

James Napier                                    Nutrient mgt. plan

Tony Panetta                                     Cover crop

Louis Rose                                         Cover crop

Tim Rose                                            Grassed waterway (2)

Verleigh Powers                               Fence

Don Smith                                         Brush management (2)

Charles Stahl                                    Cover crop

James Stahl                                      Cover crop

John Stahl                                         Cover crop

Robert Stahl                                      Cover crop

James Tolliver                                  Brush management (2)

Dave Uible                                         Conservation Stewardship Program

Varick Family Trust                         Brush management (3), forest stand improvement

Laura Weber                                      Brush management (5)

David Werring                                   Nutrient management

Tim Werring                                       Nutrient management, cover crop

Tony Werring                                     Nutrient management, cover crop

David Werring                                   Nutrient management, cover crop

December 6, 2017

Clermont SWCD’s 75th Anniversary: A Look Back to 1943

Cost of Living: 1943 vs. 2016

Average cost of new house $3,600 $ 288,000
Average wages per year $2,000 $ 57,617
Cost of a gallon of gas $0.15 $ 1.95
Average cost for house rent $40/mo. $ 1,021/mo.
Bottle of Coca Cola $0.05 $ 1.75
Average price for a new car $900 $ 34,300

 

Average Crop Production, 1943

Commodity Yield Bu./Ac. $/Bu.
Corn 32.6 $1.08
Soybeans 18.3 $1.81
Wheat 16.4 $1.35

Average Crop Production 2016

Commodity Yield Bu./Ac. $/Bu.
Corn 174.6 $3.40
Soybeans 52.1 $9.50
Wheat 52.6 $3.85
December 6, 2017

Anspach, Phillips Re-elected to Board of Supervisors

In the election held on September 14th, Dave Anspach (left) retained his seat on the Clermont Soil and Water Conservation District’s Board of Supervisors, where he will begin serving his sixth term. Dave lives on the family farm in Owensville and is a past administrator for the district.

Steve Phillips (right) has also retained his seat by being elected to his fourth term as board supervisor. Steve was the District’s Cooperator of the Year in 2008 and a lifelong resident of Clermont County.

Their terms will begin January 1, 2018 and run through 2021.

Congratulations to both gentlemen and thank you for serving your conservation district and county!

November 9, 2017

Guidebook available on detention basins

In 1990, Clermont County established storm water management regulations to help manage storm water in an urbanizing county. With more businesses, houses and roads, there is less open ground to absorb the rain that falls. Most new developments are required to have storm water runoff controls, such as detention basins, to help manage the extra runoff. In most cases, the responsibility to maintain and repair detention basins falls on the owner of the property, or possibly a homeowners’ association.

To help owners understand the tasks involved, Clermont SWCD recently published a resource guide titled “Maintaining Your Detention Basin: A Guidebook for Private Owners in Clermont County.”

A detention basin is a low-lying area designed to temporarily capture and hold storm water runoff during periods of heavy rain. After the rain ceases, the basin slowly releases the water over a period of one or two days to minimize flooding and stream bank erosion problems downstream.  Basins also help remove sediments from storm water runoff, which improves the quality of local streams.

The guidebook will help answer questions and provide owners with detailed instructions for basin maintenance activities.  The booklet includes information on the components of a detention basin, recommended maintenance activities and inspection schedules, vegetation management, mosquito control and more.

Routine maintenance will help prolong the life of the detention basin, help prevent flooding and property damage, and protect local streams and lakes. Routine maintenance will also help minimize the necessity for more costly repairs.

Click here to download a copy of the “Maintaining Your Detention Basin” guidebook, or call the Clermont Soil & Water Conservation District at 513.732.7075.

August 3, 2017

Stocking Cool Water Fish

Stocking cool water fish such as trout, perch, or walleye can bring added enjoyment to your fishing lake. Typically these fish are stocked in deep spring fed ponds in our region of Ohio. Cool water fish require more oxygen than the traditional stocked pond fish, so aeration is highly recommended.

Landowners with smaller, warmer lakes can also stock these fish on a seasonal basis. They are typically stocked in the fall and are fished until early spring when the water begins to warm again. At this point the fish will typically die. Cool water fish stocked in this manner are typically “pan ready”, meaning they are harvestable sizes when stocked. If you are looking for a fun option to put food on the table, this may be worthwhile.

Speak with a certified fish hatchery to determine if your pond will meet your expectations of a cool water fishery. Order early in the season to guarantee shipment for when you plan to stock. If you are planning a family or community fishing party/tournament, this could add to the excitement of your event.

Posted in: pond
August 3, 2017

Natural Resources Day a Success

Fair goers were given the opportunity to meet (and play) with representatives from the Clermont SWCD along with ODNR Division of Wildlife and Parks, Brown County Beekeepers, National Wild Turkey Federation, Clermont County Parks, Ohio Trappers, and USDA-APHIS-Asian Longhorn Beetle experts during the Natural Resources Day held at the Clermont County Fair. Archery, BB-guns, reptiles, and other exhibits were on display along with our own stream table (see photo on right) and paper recycling station for people to interact with.

Thanks to everybody who stopped in and made it our largest event to date!

Posted in: Uncategorized